Forms, Maps, Design Data and Bylaws

Shuswap Development Bylaws

Contact the Shuswap Development and Building Department

Shuswap Forms and Checklists

Click here for all Shuswap Development and Building Forms and Checklists

Shuswap Maps

Contact the Shuswap Development and Planning for any required maps.

Survey Plan Search - You can perform a Survey Plan Search on the Canada Centre for Cadastral Management website here.

Shuswap Design Data

  • Weather and Weather Design Data
  • Suggested Design Loads
  • Manufactured Homes and Trailers Information
  • Manufactured Stone
  • Cementitious Plank Siding Product
  • Sprayed Polyurethane Foam Insulation on Underside of Roof Sheathing
  • Basic Part 9 Foundations for Simple Houses and Pre-Manufactured Homes

 

Weather and Weather Design Data

Climate Information Design Data for Selected Locations

Snow Loads refer to design loads provided by RDEK. Snow Load data (December 31, 2006)

Number of Degree days below 18 degree C = 4650

 

Suggested Design Loads

When engineering floor systems and roof systems our preferred deflection design load is L/480 as opposed to the L/360 minimum identified by code. Where code requires design deflection loads over L/480 do not reduce the design load.

 

Manufactured Homes and Trailers Information

Manufactured homes to be installed on Shuswap Indian Band Land shall meet Canadian Standards Association – Standard A277
(CAN/CSA-Z240 MH Series will not longer be accepted for permanent homes.)

 

Manufactured Stone Veneers

Most manufactured stone veneer suppliers do not recommend installing manufactured stone over top of any type of building wrap with OSB sheathing products behind as a substrate. Over a longer period of time, the OSB absorbs moisture through the building wrap material and swells. The swelling of the OSB can lead to cracking of the mortar joints and deterioration of the manufactured stone assembly.

This does not meet with the intent of the British Columbia Building Code and therefore the Shuswap Development and Building Department does not accept manufactured stone installed over any OSB products.

We prefer to see a rain screen type of detail behind the manufactured stone. Alternatively, the builder may use pressure treated plywood. However, the builder must make certain that the preservative products within the pressure treated lumber do not present chemical reaction issues, staining issues or any other related issues with adjacent materials.

For more information refer to the Manufactured Stone Veneer form.

 

Cementitious Plank Siding Product

Use caution when designing projects with wood wall studs at 24” o.c. when considering cementitious plank siding. Most manufacturers of cementitious plank siding products do not accept blind nailing of their siding at 24” o.c. Attachment of the siding must be into the stud framing of the wall assembly. Attachment of the siding directly into 3/8” sheathing, not at the framing studs, is not acceptable by either the British Columbia Building Code or the manufacturer's acceptable standard. The manufacturers will accept a combination of both blind nailing and face nailing at 8” o.c. into minimum thickness 7/16” OSB with nails with over sized head. However, the exposed nailing is not very appealing to the eye and becomes a maintenance problem.

The Shuswap Development and Building Department does not accept attachment of cementitious plank siding into studs at 24” o.c. or into 3/8” sheathing. Consult the manufacturer’s literature prior to completing your design to ensure you can comply with their attachment requirements.

Refer to Exterior Wall Cladding Form.

 

Sprayed Polyurethane Foam Insulation on Underside of Roof Sheathing

Use caution when designing your building envelope using 2 lb density closed cell polyurethane insulation on the underside of the roof sheathing and installing roofing materials directly overtop of the sheathing. There are a number of concerns within the construction industry with respect to this installation and the ability of the structural wood members to dry, when wet from ingress moisture from the topside of the roof assembly as the roofing system ages. The concern is about long term deterioration of these structural wood members due to the potentially limited drying ability and the potential for decay and structural failure.

The Canadian Urethane Foam Contractors Association (CUFCA) and the Spray Foam Institute (SPI) are in the process of raising funds to begin testing with the National Research Council (NRC) and the Canadian Construction Materials Council (CCMC). Fund raising is expected to be completed by late 2009. Upon completion of fund raising CCMC testing will commence with a 2 to 3 year testing program.

CCMC’s and NRC’s current stance on this issue is that they require these roof systems to be vented as per the 2005 National Building Codes, which is what the 2006 British Columbia Building Code is based on. Therefore, the Shuswap Development and Building Department will not accept this type of assembly under Part 9 of the 2006 British Columbia Building Code.

However, if the proposed system is engineered by a Professional Building Envelope Architect registered in the Province of British Columbia or Building Envelope Engineer registered in the Province of British Columbia and they provide the Shuswap Development and Building Department with a letter approving the assembly and the letter specifically identifies that project and is complete with their professional seal and signature, then the system will be accepted for that particular project.

Alternatively, the roof can be sheathing and foamed on the underside of the sheathing if the top side of the sheathing is strapped to achieve the 63mm of clear venting, as required by section 9.19.2.13 Clearances of the 2006 British Columbia Building Code, then re-sheathed and properly vented, creating a vented roof assembly that will assist in drying of the top chords of the structural wood members in question. The roofing waterproofing (shingles, etc) would then be installed over the second layer of sheathing. This WILL comply with Part 9 of the 2006 British Columbia Building Code.

Refer to Closed cell Polyurethane Foam Insulation at Roof Decks Information Sheet.

 

Basic Part 9 Foundations for Simple Houses and Pre-Manufactured Homes

The following a detailed foundation wall sections for basic foundation for simple houses and pre-manufactured houses that will be installed on Shuswap Indian Band Land. The details are based on Part 9 minimal requirements for concrete foundations assuming adequate soil bearing capacity as indicated by the 2006 British Columbia Building Code.

For more information contact the Development and Building Department.